Caregiver Law & Legal Definition


A caregiver is someone, typically over age 18, who provides care for another. It may be a person who is responsible for the direct care, protection, and supervision of children in a child care home, or someone who tends to the needs of the elderly or disabled. It is generally one who gives assistance to another person who is no longer able to perform the critical tasks of personal or household care necessary for everyday survival.

Caregivers are governed by federal and state laws, which vary by state. Various laws regulate eligibility and standards of conduct, such as abuse or neglect of a client or misappropriation of a client’s property.

The following is an example of a state statute defining a caregiver:

NRS 453A.080 “Designated primary caregiver” defined.

1. “Designated primary caregiver” means a person who:

(a) Is 18 years of age or older;

(b) Has significant responsibility for managing the well-being of a person diagnosed with a chronic or debilitating medical condition; and

(c) Is designated as such in the manner required pursuant to NRS 453A.250.

2. The term does not include the attending physician of a person diagnosed with a chronic or debilitating medical condition.