Writ of Sequestration Law & Legal Definition


A writ of sequestration is a prejudgment process which orders the seizure or attachment of property to be maintained in the custody of the U.S. Marshal or other designated official, under court order and supervision, until the court determines otherwise. The purpose of the writ is to preserve the named property pending outcome of the litigation. The order binds the property of the defendant from the time it is issued. The writ of sequestration will lay out what specific powers have been given to the sequestrators to enable them to carry out the sequestration.

The writ is served according to the instructions contained within it and in compliance with state law, which governs procedures for sequestration. The requesting party may be required to provide an indemnity bond and an advance deposit to cover the U.S. Marshal's estimated out-of-pocket expenses. It is advisable for the requesting party to accompany the U.S. Marshal in executing the writ so that he or she may answer any questions that may arise. Generally, the U.S. Marshal will maintain custody of the seized property under court supervision. Alternatively, the requesting party may be named substitute custodian for the U.S. Marshal and maintain direct responsibility for custody of the seized property, either by court order or by written agreement with the U.S. Marshal. Proof of insurance against loss and payment of storage fees will be required if the requesting party has arranged for moving or storage of the property.

The following is an example of a Texas statute governinig writs of sequestration:

Sec. 62.001. GROUNDS. A writ of sequestration is available to a plaintiff in a suit if: (1) the suit is for title or possession of personal property or fixtures or for foreclosure or enforcement of a mortgage, lien, or security interest on personal property or fixtures and a reasonable conclusion may be drawn that there is immediate danger that the defendant or the party in possession of the property will conceal, dispose of, ill-treat, waste, or destroy the property or remove it from the county during the suit;

(2) the suit is for title or possession of real property or for foreclosure or enforcement of a mortgage or lien on real property and a reasonable conclusion may be drawn that there is immediate danger that the defendant or the party in possession of the property will use his possession to injure or ill-treat the property or waste or convert to his own use the timber, rents, fruits, or revenue of the property;

(3) the suit is for the title or possession of property from which the plaintiff has been ejected by force or violence; or

(4) the suit is to try the title to real property, to remove a cloud from the title of real property, to foreclose a lien on real property, or to partition real property and the plaintiff makes an oath that one or more of the defendants is a nonresident of this state. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.002. PENDING SUIT REQUIRED. A writ of sequestration may be issued at the initiation of a suit or at any time before final judgment. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.003. AVAILABLE FOR CLAIM NOT DUE. A writ of sequestration may be issued for personal property under a mortgage or a lien even though the right of action on the mortgage or lien has not accrued. The proceedings relating to the writ shall be as in other cases, except that final judgment may not be rendered against the defendant until the right of action has accrued. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

SUBCHAPTER B. ISSUANCE

Sec. 62.021. WHO MAY ISSUE. A district or county court judge or a justice of the peace may issue writs of sequestration returnable to his court. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.022. APPLICATION. The application for a writ of sequestration must be made under oath and must set forth:


(1) the specific facts stating the nature of the plaintiff's claim;
(2) the amount in controversy, if any; and
(3) the facts justifying issuance of the writ.
Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.023. REQUIRED STATEMENT OF RIGHTS. (a) A writ of sequestration must prominently display the following statement on the face of the writ:

YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO REGAIN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY BY FILING A REPLEVY BOND. YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO SEEK TO REGAIN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY BY FILING WITH THE COURT A MOTION TO DISSOLVE THIS WRIT.

(b) The statement must be printed in 10-point type and in a manner intended to advise a reasonably attentive person of its contents.

Sec. 62.001. GROUNDS. A writ of sequestration is available to a plaintiff in a suit if:

(1) the suit is for title or possession of personal property or fixtures or for foreclosure or enforcement of a mortgage, lien, or security interest on personal property or fixtures and a reasonable conclusion may be drawn that there is immediate danger that the defendant or the party in possession of the property will conceal, dispose of, ill-treat, waste, or destroy the property or remove it from the county during the suit;

(2) the suit is for title or possession of real property or for foreclosure or enforcement of a mortgage or lien on real property and a reasonable conclusion may be drawn that there is immediate danger that the defendant or the party in possession of the property will use his possession to injure or ill-treat the property or waste or convert to his own use the timber, rents, fruits, or revenue of the property;

(3) the suit is for the title or possession of property from which the plaintiff has been ejected by force or violence; or

(4) the suit is to try the title to real property, to remove a cloud from the title of real property, to foreclose a lien on real property, or to partition real property and the plaintiff makes an oath that one or more of the defendants is a nonresident of this state. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.002. PENDING SUIT REQUIRED. A writ of sequestration may be issued at the initiation of a suit or at any time before final judgment. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.003. AVAILABLE FOR CLAIM NOT DUE. A writ of sequestration may be issued for personal property under a mortgage or a lien even though the right of action on the mortgage or lien has not accrued. The proceedings relating to the writ shall be as in other cases, except that final judgment may not be rendered against the defendant until the right of action has accrued. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

SUBCHAPTER B. ISSUANCE

Sec. 62.021. WHO MAY ISSUE. A district or county court judge or a justice of the peace may issue writs of sequestration returnable to his court. Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.022. APPLICATION. The application for a writ of sequestration must be made under oath and must set forth:


(1) the specific facts stating the nature of the plaintiff's claim;
(2) the amount in controversy, if any; and
(3) the facts justifying issuance of the writ.
Acts 1985, 69th Leg., ch. 959, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1985.

Sec. 62.023. REQUIRED STATEMENT OF RIGHTS. (a) A writ of sequestration must prominently display the following statement on the face of the writ:

YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO REGAIN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY BY FILING A REPLEVY BOND. YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO SEEK TO REGAIN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY BY FILING WITH THE COURT A MOTION TO DISSOLVE THIS WRIT.

(b) The statement must be printed in 10-point type and in a manner intended to advise a reasonably attentive person of its contents.