Adverse Job Action Law and Legal Definition

P> An adverse job action is an employer’s action that affects an employee’s job negatively. Losses of pay, termination, or demotion are all examples of adverse job actions. Lesser actions, such as a poor evaluation or changes in job responsibilities that do not result in loss of pay or benefits are not classified as adverse job actions.

An adverse job action "must be materially adverse, meaning more than a mere inconvenience or an alteration of job responsibilities." [Ribando v. United Airlines, Inc., 200 F.3d 507, 510 (7th Cir. 1999)]. This includes termination, a demotion with a decrease in wages, a less distinguished title, a material loss of benefits, or significantly diminished material responsibilities. [Ribando v. United Airlines, Inc., 200 F.3d 507, 510 (7th Cir. 1999)].

An adverse job action is also termed as adverse employment action.

The following is an example of a case law referring to the term:

Not everything that makes an employee unhappy is an actionable adverse action. Otherwise, minor and even trivial employment actions that an irritable, chip-on-the-shoulder employee did not like would form the basis of a discrimination suit. Although the term is defined broadly, the adverse job action must be "materially" adverse, meaning more than a mere inconvenience or an alteration of job responsibilities. [Goad v. Sterling Commerce, Inc., 2000 Ohio App. LEXIS 2496 (Ohio Ct. App. 2000)].