Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 Law and Legal Definition

The Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (“Act”) is a U.S. federal legislation that established Food for Peace, the primary U.S. overseas food assistance program. This Act was signed into law on July 10, 1954 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

According to Eisenhower, the purpose of the legislation was to "lay the basis for a permanent expansion of our exports of agricultural products with lasting benefits to ourselves and peoples and peoples of other lands."

The Act authorized:

a. Concessional sales of U.S. agricultural commodities to developing countries and private entities by USDA;

b. Direct donation of U.S. agricultural commodities for emergency relief and development;

c. Government-to-government grants of agricultural commodities tied to policy reform, both assigned to USAID in 1961 when the act was renamed The Food for Peace Act.