Atlantic Salmon Convention Act of 1982 Law and Legal Definition

The Atlantic Salmon Convention Act of 1982 is a U.S. federal legislation enacted to legislate various U.S. responsibilities as a signatory to the Convention for the Conservation of Salmon in the North Atlantic Ocean. The provisions of the Act are found under 16 USCS §§ 3601 through 3608.

Pursuant to the Act, the U.S. President is required to appoint three U.S. Commissioners to the Council and Commissions established by the Convention for the Conservation of Salmon in the North Atlantic Ocean (Convention). The Act authorizes the Secretary of State to: receive reports, requests, recommendations and proposals from the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO); approve or object to regulatory measures proposed in accordance with the Convention, in concurrence with the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of the Interior; and act upon communications received from NASCO.

The Act mandates the Secretary of Commerce to promulgate various regulations to carry out the Convention and this Act. The Secretary is also responsible for implementing regulations binding on the U.S. under the Convention.

Pursuant to the Act, it is illegal for a person or vessel to fish for salmon in certain Atlantic Ocean waters, or to violate the Convention, this Act or any regulations enacted under the Act. Violation is subject to civil and criminal penalties, and civil forfeiture of the vessel.