Bioequivalence [Food and Drugs] Law and Legal Definition

Pursuant to 21 CFR 320.1 (e) [Title 21 Food and Drugs; Chapter I Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services; Subchapter D Drugs for Human Use; Part 320 Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Requirements; Subpart A General Provisions], Bioequivalence means “the absence of a significant difference in the rate and extent to which the active ingredient or active moiety in pharmaceutical equivalents or pharmaceutical alternatives becomes available at the site of drug action when administered at the same molar dose under similar conditions in an appropriately designed study. Where there is an intentional difference in rate (e.g., in certain extended release dosage forms), certain pharmaceutical equivalents or alternatives may be considered bioequivalent if there is no significant difference in the extent to which the active ingredient or moiety from each product becomes available at the site of drug action. This applies only if the difference in the rate at which the active ingredient or moiety becomes available at the site of drug action is intentional and is reflected in the proposed labeling, is not essential to the attainment of effective body drug concentrations on chronic use, and is considered medically insignificant for the drug.”