Black Scholes Law and Legal Definition

The Black–Scholes model is a mathematical description of financial markets and derivative investment instruments. The model develops partial differential equations whose solution, the Black–Scholes formula, is widely used in the pricing of European-style options.

The model assumes that the price of heavily traded assets follow a geometric Brownian motion with constant drift and volatility. When applied to a stock option, the model incorporates the constant price variation of the stock, the time value of money, the option's strike price and the time to the option's expiry.

The model was first articulated by Fischer Black and Myron Scholes in their 1973 paper, "The Pricing of Options and Corporate Liabilities." The fundamental insight of Black–Scholes is that the option is implicitly priced if the stock is traded.