Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property Law and Legal Definition

Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property or Paris Convention is a treaty designed to unify and streamline patent prosecutions and trademark applications among the signatories. As a result of this treaty, intellectual property, including patents, of any contracting state are accessible to the nationals of other states party to the Convention. The Convention was first signed in 1883 and revised most recently in 1970. The Convention now has 173 contracting member countries, which makes it one of the most widely adopted treaties worldwide. The Convention eased the harsh effects of the first-to-file priority rule and also banned patent-protection discrimination against residents of other member nations.