Quicquid Plantatur Solo, Solo Cedit Law and Legal Definition

Quicquid Plantatur Solo, Solo Cedit is a Latin maxim which means “whatever is affixed to the ground belongs to the ground." In Roman law, the maxim was applied mostly to determine that trees and crops were sold with, and formed part of the land. According to the maxim, loose bricks are chattels or movable or personal property. Loose bricks do not form part of the land. However, if loose bricks are cemented together and used to erect a house, the bricks become part of the land and get converted to real property. Chattels which gets converted to real property by operation of the maxim are called fixtures.

Quicquid Plantatur Solo, Solo Cedit is of great significance in tenancy laws. Any improvement made by a tenant, that gets converted to real property, by operation of the maxim becomes part of landlord’s property. The improvement cannot be reclaimed by the tenant at the end of the lease.