U.N. Committee on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women [CEDAW] Law and Legal Definition

The U.N. Committee on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) is a treaty monitoring body established for monitoring compliance of state with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (Convention). CEDAW was established in 1982. CEDAW consists of 23 experts on women’s rights from around the world. CEDAW watches the progress for women made in the states that were parties to the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

The state parties must submit their regular reports to CEDAW about how the rights of the Convention are implemented. Each State party’s report will be examined and they will address their concerns and recommendations to the state party in the form of concluding observations. CEDAW shall receive communications from individuals or groups of individuals about violations of rights protected under the Convention and shall initiate inquiries into situations of grave or systematic violations of women’s rights. CEDAW shall also make recommendation on issues affecting women that requires more attention.