U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency [ACDA] Law and Legal Definition

The U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) was established as an independent agency of the United States government by the Arms Control and Disarmament Act on September 26, 1961. Its predecessor was the U.S. Disarmament Administration.

ACDA ensures that arms control is fully integrated into the development and conduct of United States national security policy. ACDA also conducted, supported, and coordinated research for arms control and disarmament policy formulation, prepared for and managed U.S. participation in international arms control and disarmament negotiations, and prepared and directed U.S. participation in international arms control and disarmament system.

ACDA also serves as Senior Adviser to the President and the Secretary of State on Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament. Four bureaus of the Department are specifically designated to perform these functions, working in close cooperation with the Department's bureaus responsible for specific regions of the world as well as with other functional bureaus are the Bureau of Arms Control , the Bureau of Nonproliferation, the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs' and the Bureau of Verification and Compliance.