Uniform Act on Intestacy, Wills, and Donative Transfers Law and Legal Definition

Uniform Act on Intestacy, Wills, and Donative Transfers (UAIWDT) is a uniform act drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in 1991. This act modernizes the law of estates, trusts and future interests. Where the Uniform Probate Code (UPC) is in force, this act may be codified as Article II of the UPC. The Uniform Probate Code was originally promulgated in 1969. The Uniform Law Commissioners provided the first revision of Article II in 1990. In 1991, the NCCUSL sanctioned it for enactment as a separate law and thus the Uniform Act on Intestacy, Wills, and Donative Transfers came into being.

UAIWDT provides governing rules for making transfers of property at death. It also provides rules for intestate succession, which are the rules that apply when a person dies without a will other instrument establishing where property goes after his/her death. Further, UAIWDT contains rules that strongly parallel rules for construction of wills, to guide construction of beneficiary provisions in life insurance contracts, revocable trusts and other will substitutes.

The act has been adopted by many states like Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Minnesota, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota and West Virginia.