General Verdict With Interrogatories Law and Legal Definition

General verdict with interrogatories refers to a general verdict accompanied by answers to written interrogatories on one or more issues of fact that bear on the verdict. A interrogatory is submitted by the judge to a jury when the court asks for a general verdict and wants to know the basis of the decision.

According to USCS Fed Rules Civ Proc R 49 the court may submit to the jury forms for a general verdict, together with written questions on one or more issues of fact that the jury must decide. The court must give the instructions and explanations necessary to enable the jury to render a general verdict and answer the questions in writing, and must direct the jury to do both.

The following is an example of a State Statute (Kansas) on General verdict with interrogatories:

According to K.S.A. § 60-249 (b) the judge may if requested in writing, submit to the jury, together with appropriate forms for a general verdict, written interrogatories upon one or more substantial questions of disputed facts on which decision is necessary to a verdict. The number and form thereof shall be subject to the control of the judge. The court shall give such explanation or instruction as may be necessary to enable the jury both to make answers to the interrogatories and to render a general verdict, and the court shall direct the jury both to make written answers and to render a general verdict. When the general verdict and the answers are harmonious, the court shall direct the entry of the appropriate judgment upon the verdict and answers. When the answers are consistent with each other but one or more is inconsistent with the general verdict, the court may direct the entry of judgment in accordance with the answers, notwithstanding the general verdict or may return the jury for further consideration of its answers and verdict or may order a new trial. When the answers are inconsistent with each other and one or more is likewise inconsistent with the general verdict, judgment shall not be entered, but the court shall return the jury for further consideration of its answers and verdict or shall order a new trial.