Justification Law and Legal Definition

Justification is a reason acceptable to a court as to why the defendant did what he is charged with having done. In short, through justification, the accused party shows and maintains a good legal reason in court, why he did the thing he is called upon to answer. For example, in an action of libel, a defense showing the libel to be true; in an action of assault, showing the violence to have been necessary; and good cause for abandoning, deserting, or failing to support wife.. A reason for committing an act which otherwise would constitute an actionable wrong or tort. Justification is a reason for committing an act which otherwise would constitute an actionable wrong or tort.

It is an ancient principle of the common law that a trespass may be justified in many cases. A man may justify what would otherwise have been a trespass. For example, an entry on the land of another to demand a debt due to him by the owner of the land or to remove chattels which belong to him is justifiable. Any such entry should be peaceable. Justification must be specially pleaded in court. Courts do not accept the justification given in evidence under the plea of the general issue. Plea of justification supported by evidence is a complete bar to the action.