Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 Law and Legal Definition

The Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 is a United States federal law that seeks to discourage federal managers and supervisors from engaging in unlawful discrimination and retaliation. It is popularly called the No-FEAR Act. The main provision of the No-FEAR Act is that it requires federal agencies to pay awards for discrimination and retaliation violations out of their own budgets. They are required to reimburse the General Fund of the Treasury within a reasonable time of any such award. The Act requires notification to be given to all federal employees and applicants for employment about their rights under federal law. All federal agencies are also required to provide training to all their employees about their rights and remedies under antidiscrimination and anti-retaliation laws. The Act also permits rule-making, and requires studies of retaliation and discrimination by federal agencies.